St. Patrick on Wikipedia (Slate)

I wrote a piece for Slate called “Why the Wikipedia page for St. Patrick is Surprisingly Good.” When I started doing research on St. Patrick’s page, I was pleasantly surprised to have the two top St. Patrick scholars tell me that the Wikipedia page was excellent. Writing the article also allowed me to learn more […]

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Curling’s Wikipedia Page is Savage (VICE)

I wrote about The Battle for Curling’s Wikipedia Page for VICE Sports, noting “The edit history of the curling page is an anthology of cold burns.” Why so much angst? Hint: A lot of it has to do with trolls claiming it’s not a sport. Eric Washburn was a fantastic interview for the piece. Eric […]

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Honda Ridgeline is Best in Class

Jalopnik‘s David Tracy offers some fascinating WikiHistory in his article “The Story Behind The Honda Ridgeline’s Wildly, Unusually Detailed Wikipedia Page.” Writes Tracy: Detailed information on intake airflow paths, and the shape and material makeup of the unibody. Data on torque curves and all available paint color names. The breakdown of tweeter speakers versus full-range […]

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Social Justice Warrior is a Minefield

The Outline reviewed the Wikipedia article for “Social Justice Warrior.” Stephen Harrison describes the entry’s inauspicious beginnings: The Wikipedia entry for “Social justice warrior” has struggled since its ugly beginning. On September 28, 2014, a Wikipedia editor named Equality not Feminism created the original three line entry: “Social Justice Warriors, commonly referred to as as [sic] SJWs, are people […]

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Weepuls are Weird

Ashwin Rodrigues from The Outline wrote a review of the Wikipedia article for Weepul toys. According to Rodrigues: There is one glaring, inexcusable omission on the Weepul Wikipedia entry. There are zero mentions of the Weepul as a cult-like promotional device used in school fundraisers [. . .] In a phrase: Deceptively superficial. Read the […]

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